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Let's get together on Monday for our last chance to work on your Scalar projects.  These are due on Friday, May 18.  (To submit your project, email me the link to your Scalar book.)  If you get me a draft of your book by Wed., May 17, I can give you some feedback.

Don't forget: your "syllabus builder" blog post is due on Monday, May 14.

A few final Scalar details: 1) to make your book public and allow me to view it, go to the "Sharing" tab in your dashboard, under "Availability," be sure to click the "Make URL public?" option to "yes"; 2) double check your pages to makes sure that all of them - - or the ones you want to publish - -are live, e.g. go to the "Pages" tab in your dashboard, look at the second column ("Live?"), and make sure that there is a "1" (and not a "0") for each page that you want to appear in your book;  3) add a table of contents - - go to the "Book properties" tab in your dashboard and click on the link that says "Add table of comments item."  (You can then order your pages by dragging them into the proper sequence.)

Welcome to the Temporary Autonomous Learning Lounge!  For Wed., bring a laptop, a beverage and/or snack, and your work on Scalar.  We'll use the class to work on your final project and to tackle any Scalar etc. issues that may arise.  Don't forget, your Scalar project is due Friday, May 18, by noon.  Submit the project by sending me the link to your Scalar book.

Also, further info on the syllabus builder assignment:  Your goal is to persuade me to add your suggested text to the syllabus.  The best way to accomplish this is probably to think about and to clearly articulate how your candidate text - - book, comic book, tv series, movie - - "fits" with the text's we've read this semester.  I.e. how does your suggested text comment on or develop the various motifs, themes, problems, etc. that we've talked about in our texts.  Post your argument to your blog.  Due: Monday, May 14.

Let's finish talking about Alina Simone's Note to Self.

Keep working on your final Scalar project.  Bring any questions about Scalar to class.  And, don't forget: help me improve the course syllabus!  (See below.)

Syllabus builder: I'm looking for a text (novel, comic book, tv series, etc.) to add to the syllabus (to replace Barbara Browning's novel - - which we won't be reading this semester).  Your job between now and our last day of class, Monday, May 14, is to find and propose a candidate for the syllabus.  This means: browsing, reading, and thinking about a text (novel, comic, tv series, etc.) that you haven't read before or that you'll read again; this text should make sense within our syllabus and our focus on digital cultures; writing a blog post about the "fit" between your proposed text and the class syllabus that persuades me to add the text.  (More about how to persuade me in the next blog post.)

Remember: no class on Monday!  Instead, I'll be holding open office hours in HUM 553 from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  Before you stop by to visit . . . see below.

For Monday, blog about your idea for a final project for the class.  You can choose to do something with TransmissionThe Circle, or Ready Player One.  You can even do something with two or all three of the novels.  Your final project doesn't have to be an essay; if you can come up with a creative, interesting angle on the novels, that's fantastic.  Let your imagination off the leash.  The ultimate goal is to show me what you've learned about the novel and digital culture.  Post your blog by Sunday, April 29, at noon.  I'll comment on your blog post/idea by Monday at noon.  But, if you want to talk about the project or clarify things - - stop by my office during my open office hours on Monday.  (See above.)

You'll write you final project on Scalar, a free, open platform for publishing long reads online.  You can read about Scalar and sign up to use it here.  To get a sense of what you can do on Scalar, check out: Rhea Segismundo's piece on Wikipedia or browse through some examples of "How to Not Read a Novel."  (All from last semester's Digital Humanities class - - a class I'll be offering again this fall semester.)

And, remember: I'm looking for a text (novel, comic book, tv series, etc.) to add to the syllabus (to replace Barbara Browning's novel - - which we won't be reading this semester).  Your job between now and our last day of class, Monday, May 14, is to find and propose a candidate for the syllabus.  This means: browsing, reading, and thinking about a text (novel, comic, tv series, etc.) that you haven't read before or that you'll read again; this text should make sense within our syllabus and our focus on digital cultures; writing a blog post about the "fit" between your proposed text and the class syllabus that persuades me to add the text.  (More about how to persuade me in the next blog post.)

Finally, let's read Note to Self up to around page 162/Chapter 17 for Wed.

Let's finish reading and discussing Ready Player One.  Look back over Gee's 16 principles of good game design and see how many of these you can find in OASIS.

And, blog the following: think about one course that you're taking this semester; explain how you might "gamify" the course (or key components of it) by deploying some of Gee's principles of good learning/game design.  What "problems" or issues in the course and/or its major components does your redesign address?  How does your redesign improve the course and/or some of its major components?