For Tuesday (5/4)

For Tuesday, let’s read a selection of radical poetry from the 1930s.  We’re going to run the class a little differently.  In the next couple of days, read through the sheaf of radical poetry and then go to our Radical Poetry Signup Sheet.  Choose a poet you like or want…

For Tuesday (4/27)

For Tuesday, let’s read some poetry by Helene Johnson and Georgia Douglas Johnson.  As we finish up our exploration of the New Negro Movement/Harlem Renaissance, let’s look ahead to radical poetry of the 1930s.  Take a look at the small sheaf of radical poems I’ve assembled here.  For Tuesday, make…

For Tuesday (4/20)

For Tuesday, let’s read some poetry by Gwendolyn Bennett and Alice Dunbar-Nelson.  As you read these two poets, you will probably notice some similarities and differences to Langston Hughes and Sterling Brown.  What kind of different poetic “voices” do Bennett and Dunbar-Nelson add to New Negro Movement poetry?  What new…

Featured Video Play Icon

For Tuesday (4/13)

Let’s read Sterling Brown’s poem, “Ma Rainey,” for Tuesday, April 13.  Make at least three digital annotations.  Here’s the question I have: in the poem, what makes “Ma Rainey” such a powerful figure for “folks from anyplace” who come from “miles around”? Got questions about our Ecstasy of Plagiarism assignment? …

Featured Video Play Icon

For Thursday (3/8)

For Thursday, let’s read some poetry by Langston Hughes.  I’m particularly interested in how Hughes tries to broker a marriage between poetry (a “high,” literary genre) and jazz/blues (more “low-down” genres).  Where do you see “jazzy” or “bluesy” elements in Hughes’s poetry – – not just in content but also…

For Thursday (4/1)

For Thursday, we have a writing event.  (See below.  Password: Hemingway) Looking ahead to next Tuesday, let’s get started on the “Harlem Renaissance”/”New Negro Movement.”  Read Langston Hughes’ “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” and Alain Locke’s “The New Negro.”  Make three digital annotations on each text.

For Tuesday (3/30)

I hope you’re enjoying your spring recess . . .the weather is very nice here in Oakland. For Tuesday, March 30, let’s read all of Hemingway’s short story collection – – In Our Time.  In addition to the stories themselves, I’m interested in the structure of Hemingway’s collection, especially its division…

Featured Video Play Icon

For Tuesday (3/16)

For Tuesday, finish reading Eliot’s “Waste Land.” In his fantastic essay, “The Ecstasy of Influence,” the U.S. novelist, Jonathan Lethem declares: “Visual, sound, and text collage — which for many centuries were relatively fugitive traditions (a cento here, a folk pastiche there) — became explosively central to a series of movements in…

Featured Video Play Icon

For Thursday (3/11)

For Thursday, read “To Elsie” by William Carlos Williams.  Make two digital annotations.  But, here’s the rub.  Instead of simply commenting on the poem, annotate by connecting a word or phrase or line from the poem to one of the works of art you looked at in The Armory Show. …

Featured Video Play Icon

For Tuesday (3/9)

For Tuesday, let’s talk about Ezra Pound’s “In a Station of the Metro” and “A Retrospect,” as well as “This Is Just to Say” by William Carlos Williams.  Don’t worry about annotations for these texts. Don’t forget to visit The Armory Show.